Easy fried rice

Adrian Schneider

Vegetable and egg fried rice

On Monday, I had a hankering for some eggs. Normally that’s a pretty easy thing to take care of: omelettes, fried eggs, poached eggs… all have a happy place in my limited store of memorized recipes. But I was in the mood for something different. Grasping at everything I could think of to do with eggs, a vision of scrambled eggs popped into my head. Problem was, we had run out of milk, and I wanted something stronger and eggier anyway. Scrambled eggs, just the eggs, the same kind we slice up into strips and put on fried rice….

Aha.

Fried rice

The following is what I used, but there’s no particular reason to restrict yourself to these quantities or ingredients. It turned out to be a pair of lunches’ worth.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup white basmati rice
  • 2 teaspoons low-taste cooking oil (sunflower in this case)
  • 1 cup broth (2 pouches of chicken oxo in water, here, but vegetable stock would work nicely; a teaspoon of soya sauce would have been a good addition)
  • 1/3 cup cooking onions (I used 2 miniature onions from the market)
  • 1/4 of a large sweet red bell chili (ed note: called a bell pepper by many of us)
  • the rest of a bag of frozen peas, like 1/3 cup or so
  • 2 large eggs

Directions

A bowl of fried rice isn’t especially difficult to put together. The only real trick to it, rather appropriately, is frying the rice. If you fry the rice after it’s cooked, you get blobs of rice grains that are hard and crunchy on the outside, never a texture I’ve enjoyed. So you do it before. Put the oil in a pan on medium and wait for it to get hot, then put in your uncooked rice. You want to fry the grains until they’re a nice uniform golden colour. They’ll need to be stirred constantly, especially toward the end. You’ll see the grains puff up a bit, but don’t worry, they’ll be nice and golden before they turn into Rice Krispies.

Put the rice aside in a bowl while you start the broth boiling; it needs to cool a bit. Once the rice is fried you just handle it like regular rice: put it in the boiling water, cover, turn down to a low simmer, and steam for ~15 minutes. This is a good time to start your vegetables sauteeing if you like them soft like I do. Frozen peas don’t need the cooking and can just be thrown into the rice once it’s finished steaming, but the onions and sweet chili (ed: bell pepper) want to be diced up and simmered. Once the rice is steamed and in its final absorb-the-water stage, transfer all your vegetables to the rice pot and put the lid back on.

It’s finally egg time. Despite being kinda scrambled egg-like, the cooking is more like making an omelette. Whisk up the eggs and put them into a pan preheated to medium heat. You want them to cook into a flat sheet, so make sure the pan is large enough for them to spread out. If you’re anything like me, you’ll start worrying that they’re cooking too slowly and want to turn up the heat, but keep it even; you want the middle cooked enough that you can flip the egg-disk over, but without the bottom getting scorched. Once the eggs are solid enough that you can flip them, do so (or stick them under a broiler if you prefer). They’ll cook very rapidly from here, probably only a minute or two. Slide them onto a board and slice them into short strips with a sharp knife.

Serve out the rice, and decorate liberally with the strips of egg. Then eat.

 

Adrian cooks recreationally and eats seriously in Kingston, Ontario. 
Welcome to our family’s discussion forum on food. If you’d like to submit a post, please consider yourself family, and email us at familyfoodforum@gmail.com.

After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations.”

– Oscar Wilde, A Woman of No Importance

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Easy fried rice

  1. Great idea, Adrian. I often make eggs as a last-minute lunch or supper option. I like poached eggs on some sort of hash on the weekend (I think I did a post on that actually!), and omelettes during the week. There’s also an egg and spinach sort of fritatta/omelette that I learned how to make in Argentina and that Alysha loves.

  2. Yum! I’ve made a dinner similar to this using vermicilli noodles instead of rice. I call it sad vegetable dinner because it uses up the tail end of various things…I guess the name is a little unappealing, but the taste is great!

  3. Mmm, I made fried rice last night! I opted just for chicken fried rice, though, and left out the egg. I’ve never though to fry the rice before boiling it! I’ll have to try that!

  4. Very nice Adrian. I encourage people that I teach to always have some frozen peas and eggs in the house, along with some rice, barley or quinoa. Food Fast! Your rice technique, is similar to the one used by my kids Sitoo, to make the Lebanese rice that they love.

    • Oh, Susan, remember the Cuban red beans and rice!?! That was so good! I felt anxious about the meat there (well, of course I feel anxious about the meat most places) and I pretty much lived on that red bean and rice dish and the salads. Oh, and the fruit. (Okay, maybe some rum, too.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s